Milwaukee Non-Compete Agreement

Find the right Non-Compete Agreement attorney in Milwaukee, WI

A covenant not to compete generally implies that a Wisconsin employee makes an agreement not to work for any of their employer's competitors should they leave the company for any reason. These covenants are typically called "non-compete clauses". Employees who sign them may either receive compensation or simply be required to agree as a condition for their employment.

When are Covenants not to Compete Unenforceable?

Knowing in advance whether a judge will enforce an employee's non-compete clause can be difficult. Although the interests of employers are important, courts in Wisconsin also give priority to an employee's freedom to choose the type of employment that they desire. As a result, courts usually uphold only those covenants that are consider to be reasonable according to the circumstances. Covenants not to compete that a court will categorize as unreasonable include provisions that last for a long duration or that restrict the employee to an unreasonable geographic area around Milwaukee.

Non-compete clauses are also limited in that they can only apply to competitors who are reasonably related to the industry of the employer. Lastly, the employer must have a valid business interest behind its motivation for mandating a covenant not to compete.

Do I Need an Attorney when Dealing with a Covenant not to Compete?

Since covenants could restrict your rights, you may wish to hire a Milwaukee, Wisconsin lawyer to review any documents. They will be able to negotiate further changes to the covenant, and can draft an entirely new one that is acceptable to all parties if needed. Employers can receive useful advice from an attorney should they decide to sue a worker for breaching a covenant, and employees who have signed such covenants can also benefit from a lawyer's counseling.

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Life in Milwaukee

Milwaukee, Wisconsin is the largest city in that state. It has a population of over 600,000 people.

The area now known as Milwaukee was populated by various Native American tribes for thousands of years before the arrival of European settlers. In the 1840s, a large wave of German immigrants, fleeing the 1848 revolution, sought the freedom and inexpensive land that the Milwaukee area offered. They contributed to the city's German character, which persists to this day. Beginning in the early 20th Century, Milwaukee became a major center for the socialist movement in the U.S., and elected 3 mayors from the Socialist Party.

Today, 13 companies in the Fortune 1000 have their headquarters in Milwaukee. Health care is one of the largest sectors of Milwaukee's economy, comprising about 27% of the jobs in the city. About 2/3 of the Milwaukee workforce is employed in manufacturing of some sort, which is one of the highest percentages in the U.S. - it seems clear that Milwaukee's manufacturing sector has survived the rash of factory closings and outsourcing that ravaged so many other Midwestern cities in the last few decades.

Milwaukee, Wisconsin has a thriving legal community. If you live in the Milwaukee area, and need legal services, a Milwaukee, Wisconsin lawyer can help.

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